Shiver by the River

The 30th annual SHIVER by the RIVER 5K & 10K is upon us.  Join us on the 2nd Sunday of each month: Dec 8th, Jan 12th, Feb 9th and Mar 8th, at Jim Dietrich Park, in Muhlenberg Twp.  In case you missed us last year, please note the new time:  Registration opens at 8:30, both races start at 10:00. If you can’t run all 4 of them, run 3, run 2, or run 1.  

Each year at the Shiver banquet, we ask the runners to complete a survey, asking what each runner likes best, what they like least, and any comments or suggestions.  We really do read those, and we sometimes make changes based on the suggestions. For instance, many of you have asked that we start the race earlier, so effective Dec 2018, we started at 10:00.  Below are a few responses to some of the most frequent questions. We will have more FAQ in future newsletters.  

Question(s):  Why don’t we have awards for 5K vs 10K? Why don’t we start the 5K & 10K at different times? Why don’t we have a different course for the 5K and 10K, instead of running the 5K twice for the 10K?  The answer to these questions is the same: What makes the Shiver unique is that each runner can choose their distance as they are running, possibly running 10K some months and 5K other months. Hence, the awards are combined; the starts are at the same time; and the courses have to be combined.  

Question:  How is the scoring done?  Answer: Each runner gets points equivalent to the place they finish, regardless of 5K or 10K.  If someone is the 35th person to cross the line in the 5K, they get 35 points; if they are the 35th person to cross the line in the 10K, they get 35 points.  A runner must run at least 3 of the races to be eligible for an award and if they run 4, the highest points are dropped (example, if a runner finishes 10th in the Dec 5K, 20th in the Jan 10K, 25th in the Feb 10K, and 15th in the Mar 5K, their points would be 10 + 20 + 15).   Even if several of the front runners only run 1 race, points for all runners are equivalent to the finish place .  The points assigned are not affected by how many in your age group finish the race in front of you. After the March race, the total points for each person is accumulated; then we sort by age group, and then by points, to determine winners in each age category.  We don’t calculate points for runners only completing 1 or 2 races.  If the runner completes 3 races, we total their points. If the runner completes 4 races, we determine the worst finish and drop those points, accumulating the remaining 3 races.   

If you choose not to run the race, please consider volunteering.  We need volunteers before the race, for parking and registration; during the race – on the road, at the finish line, and in the farmhouse; and after the race – for cleanup.  If you can help prior to the race, please plan to arrive between 8:00 – 8:15.  If you can help with the race itself, please arrive no later than 9:30. Look for one of the race directors somewhere around the farmhouse.   Thank you in advance for your support!

Hope to see you there!!!

Sue Jackson, Kelsey Jackson, Georgine McCool, Tiffany Pantoja

Volunteers (and runners) needed for Oley!

The Oley Valley Country Classic 10 Mile and 5K event will be on Sunday, November 10. Come out and support the runners and the club by volunteering to help make the race a success!  There’s plenty to do: race set up, runner registration, course marshal, or clean up.  Please reach out to Barry Goodhart: barrygoodhart@gmail.com or Len Burton:  leonardeburton@gmail.com to let them know you can participate. You can race and volunteer on the same day, and we will assign you accordingly.  There will be same-day registration and extra shirts available while they last! Come out and have a great day with fellow Pacers running or volunteering!  See you on race day, and follow us on Facebook:  OleyValleyCountryClassic10Mileand5kRun

Race Report: Call of the Wilds 50k

by Andy Styer

So, I signed up for this race early on, based on the description only as ” rugged, wild and lots of big climbs”. Everything I wanted to test my training and skill set. I figured this would be a good, end of season run to explore a new place. My “A” race for the year, Laurel Highlands 70.5 miler, was done and in the books. I thought that was the hardest race of the year, but boy was I wrong! I had no idea what I was in store for.


Almost immediately after the run starts ( at 6am, in the dark), you are hit with a short road section and then a gradual climb. Don’t let this runnable section fool you, because after about a mile of easy running, you get smacked with your first climb up the Mid-State Trail. And then down. And then up. And then down. The big climbs never end, and the hard, rocky descents don’t either. And when you aren’t going up or down, you are running off camber on the rocky Mid-State Trail on moss-covered and slippery rocks. Falling and tripping is the normal here, and this course requires all of your body muscles and mental focus.


About halfway through the race, you get a little break as you come down to the village of Ramsey, where you get a short reprieve from the hills with some flat running on the Pine Creek Trail. BUT, only to get greeted with the biggest climb up, up, and up! After that you get to go back down and get another nice 2-3 mile runnable section before you then get the hardest of them all: the Torbert climb. Steep and straight up around mile 26 with mostly dead legs.


The aid stations were great, with enthusiastic volunteers who were cheering you on and making lots of noise! The PA Trail Dogs put on a great event! I was happy with my effort, finishing this in 6:56. From mile 5 to the end I was passing people and no one was passing me – a good feeling to have in the race. This ends my season for the most part, but as many people know, I have been racing this year to raise funds for pancreatic cancer research, having lost my mom to this dreaded and deadly form of cancer 15 months ago. Click on this link to check it out: https://events.lustgarten.org/fundraiser/1826394

Although Laurel Highlands was my “A” race, this was my best and hardest race. So, if you want to know what Eastern States is about, but don’t want to run it, check out its baby brother and sign up for Call of the Wilds!